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AlertBoot offers a cloud-based full disk encryption and mobile device security service for companies of any size who want a scalable and easy-to-deploy solution. Centrally managed through a web based console, AlertBoot offers mobile device management, mobile antivirus, remote wipe & lock, device auditing, USB drive and hard disk encryption managed services.

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AlertBoot offers a cloud-based full disk encryption and mobile device security service for companies of any size who want a scalable and easy-to-deploy solution. Centrally managed through a web based console, AlertBoot offers mobile device management, mobile antivirus, remote wipe & lock, device auditing, USB drive and hard disk encryption managed services.

Data Encryption Software Not Used On Department Of The Interior Computers

According to InformationWeek, the Department of the Interior is unable to locate 20% of their computers.  Technically, it's 20% of a sample of computers, but assuming that sample's big enough, it should be representative of the entire number of computers (2500).  Even more worrisome is the fact that the department does not have any requirements for the use of data encryption software like AlertBoot, so they could be the victim of a data breach.

Data Security is a Remote Concern

Missing 20% of your computers is...not a good thing.  With 2500 computers in total, that would imply that 500 computers are lost.  But, even more egregious is the fact that nobody knew they were missing.

According to the InformationWeek article, the government agency is unable to "tell where or to whom agency computers are assigned."  The Fish and Wildlife Service has been fingered out as being especially egregious when it comes to keeping track of the computers.

With such scintillating record-keeping and asset-tracking, it's no wonder that things are getting lost.  I mean, you know why things get stolen from office supply closet?  Because no one's keeping track of that stuff.  Just imagine what would happen if you were to apply the same policy to computers.  Wait, no; no need to do so.  The Department of the Interior has already shown us what happens: computers go missing.

Setting the Right Policies

One of the key reasons why asset-tracking is not in place for computers is because the Department of the Interior doesn't require any hardware costing less than $5,000 to be tracked.

And, you know, that may be a valid requirement if you're constantly dealing with equipment that costs $10,000 and up.  On the other hand, if the missing 500 computers cost $1,000 each, they add up to half a million dollars, which is nothing to sneeze at.

Plus, the information on those computers could be worth much, much more.

What the Department of the Interior should do is obvious: make an exception for computers, and track them in their asset-management software regardless of what the computers cost.

On the other hand, keeping track of computers is not really security.  If they are concerned with data security what they could do is sign up with a managed encryption program like AlertBoot.  Not only is it easy to encrypt computers, it's possible to keep track of which computers are encrypted and assigned to whom.


Related Articles and Sites:
http://74.125.155.132/search?q=cache:498hLKDPXYsJ:www.informationweek.com/news/government/technology/showArticle.jhtml%3FarticleID%3D217700161+http://www.informationweek.com/news/government/technology/showArticle.jhtml%3FarticleID%3D217700161&cd=1&hl=en&ct=clnk&client=firefox-a (google cache)

 
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About sang_lee

Sang Lee is a Senior Account Manager and Security Analyst with AlertBoot, Inc., the leading provider of managed endpoint security services, based in Las Vegas, NV. Mr. Lee helps with the deployment and ongoing support of the AlertBoot disk encryption managed service. Prior to working at AlertBoot, Mr. Lee served in the South Korean Navy. He holds both a B.S. and an M.S. from Tufts University in Medford, Massachusetts, U.S.A.