in

This Blog

Syndication

Tags

News

AlertBoot offers a cloud-based full disk encryption and mobile device security service for companies of any size who want a scalable and easy-to-deploy solution. Centrally managed through a web based console, AlertBoot offers mobile device management, mobile antivirus, remote wipe & lock, device auditing, USB drive and hard disk encryption managed services.

Archives

AlertBoot Endpoint Security

AlertBoot offers a cloud-based full disk encryption and mobile device security service for companies of any size who want a scalable and easy-to-deploy solution. Centrally managed through a web based console, AlertBoot offers mobile device management, mobile antivirus, remote wipe & lock, device auditing, USB drive and hard disk encryption managed services.

Mobile Security: RIM Protects Data Better Than Windows Mobile, iPhone

You carry, on a daily basis, a device that can create a data breach.  This device is known as a smartphone, for the lack of a better term.  And, according to my reading of a research report, the presence of data encryption could be indicative of the device's overall security.

As most people know, not all smartphones are created equally.  The iPhone by Apple is considered by many as the best thing since Jesus consecrated toast.  Others will pooh-pooh this device, claiming that nothing beats a BlackBerry.  Then there are others that will swear by a Windows-powered device (although most of them will not...they're just stuck with it).

The reasons why one is better than the other is myriad: bigger screen, better web-surfing, the presence of keys (and physical feedback), etc.  But what about security?

Ranking According to Security

When it comes to security, the report claims that BlackBerrys are best, followed by Windows devices.  Coming in last is the iPhone.  This is not really news.  BlackBerrys have always been known to have a high degree of data security built-in; otherwise, it would never have been accepted so enthusiastically the business community.

Windows machines have a somewhat high degree of security just because they've been around so long.  It's one of those cases where a company is forced to think about security issues because it's had so many security issues.

Then there's the iPhone, which hasn't been around as long.  And, plenty of businesses are loath to support it because they see security issues.

So, nothing new in the report.  However, I thought it was pretty interesting to note that Windows devices and BlackBerrys didn't show much difference when it came to security.  The former got a 3 out of 4 when it came to security, while the BlackBerry got 4/4.  The difference mainly seems to lie on how effectively encryption has been implemented into the devices and data transmissions.

Which just goes to show that data security is better achieved if you plan it ahead and then implement it, as opposed to adding it on an ad hoc basis.  Encryption software like AlertBoot will do a better job of protecting your company's digital assets if some thought is put into it; plus, it will help you figure out which areas cannot be protected by encryption--and give you a chance to shore up those areas as well.

Related Articles and Sites:
http://web.mac.com/mardelibre/Lopez_Research/Research/Entries/2009/5/25_Mobile_security_files/Final%20Mobile%20Deployments%20Require%20Robust%20Security%20May%2009.pdf
http://www.eweek.com/c/a/Mobile-and-Wireless/Research-In-Motion-Tops-Security-Assessment-783185/?kc=rss

 
<Previous Next>

Drive Encryption Used In Missing UFCW Laptop? Revisiting An Earlier Story

Hard Drive Encryption: Stolen Laptop Did Not Use, 109000 Affected

Comments

No Comments

About sang_lee

Sang Lee is a Senior Account Manager and Security Analyst with AlertBoot, Inc., the leading provider of managed endpoint security services, based in Las Vegas, NV. Mr. Lee helps with the deployment and ongoing support of the AlertBoot disk encryption managed service. Prior to working at AlertBoot, Mr. Lee served in the South Korean Navy. He holds both a B.S. and an M.S. from Tufts University in Medford, Massachusetts, U.S.A.