in

This Blog

Syndication

Tags

News

AlertBoot offers a cloud-based full disk encryption and mobile device security service for companies of any size who want a scalable and easy-to-deploy solution. Centrally managed through a web based console, AlertBoot offers mobile device management, mobile antivirus, remote wipe & lock, device auditing, USB drive and hard disk encryption managed services.

Archives

AlertBoot Endpoint Security

AlertBoot offers a cloud-based full disk encryption and mobile device security service for companies of any size who want a scalable and easy-to-deploy solution. Centrally managed through a web based console, AlertBoot offers mobile device management, mobile antivirus, remote wipe & lock, device auditing, USB drive and hard disk encryption managed services.

Burglarized Church: Computer Theft Targeted Hard Drives Only

There is news that a church in the state of Georgia fell victim to burglary.  The thieves, however, seem to have been after a particular item: data.

 

The effort was well coordinated, according to an article at thecitizen.com.  The thieves entered the church from the darkest point outside the church.  A window was left unlocked prior to the theft, so there was no forcing into the building.  Once inside, the thieves went straight to the church office.  The doors were knocked in—and in one case a sledge hammer was used to knock a hole in the wall, and unlock another door from the inside, as it were.

 

This case is particularly interesting because the article implies that the thieves spent the time to take out the hard drives from two computers and stealing those, instead of stealing the entire machine.  Also, they stole a computer monitor as well, which, frankly, doesn’t make sense to me.  If one decides to steal only the hard drive, presumably it’s so one is not weighed down by the size or the weight.  Why go ahead and steal something that’s equally as big?  (In some cases, bigger.)  Cash and blank checks in plain sight were not stolen.  Yet, it doesn’t sound like the thieves didn’t notice the money because they were in a hurry: they also broke into file cabinets and drawers, so it seems that they were actively searching for objects of value.  Regardless, it seems only the hard drives and the monitor were the only things stolen.

 

This is probably the first case I’ve read of where there is no confusion on why the thieves stole a “computer.”  When computers or laptops get stolen, there is generally what I call the standard disclaimer by the spokesperson: “we don’t feel that the machines were stolen for identity theft reasons, but was a theft of opportunity.  The criminals was probably after the street value of the machine in question,” etc.  But when people plan out a burglary and take the time to disassemble a computer and steal the hard disk only….  Well, no room for confusion there, eh?

 

Thankfully, the church didn’t keep any sensitive information on those computers.  Critical employee and contributor information is kept somewhere else, so the thieves made off with something of questionable value.  On the other hand, information has a tendency of ending up where it shouldn’t, so only time will tell if the thieves expended their energies for naught.

 

AlertBoot was made situations like these, of course.  Had both hard drives been encrypted with whole disk encryption, the thieves wouldn’t be able to access the information at all.  As far as I can tell, there was no encryption on those drives—and this means that those thieves will be accessing that data soon, if they haven’t already.  After all, there are no obstructions in place, and I think it’s a safe assumption that anyone who takes the time to steal only the core of a computer also knows how to gain tap information from an unencrypted data source.

 
<Previous Next>

UPS Loses Dormitory Authority Data Tapes With 800 Employee Records. Data Encryption Not Used

Data Security And Computer Disposal: There's Delete And Then There's Delete

Comments

No Comments

About sang_lee

Sang Lee is a Senior Account Manager and Security Analyst with AlertBoot, Inc., the leading provider of managed endpoint security services, based in Las Vegas, NV. Mr. Lee helps with the deployment and ongoing support of the AlertBoot disk encryption managed service. Prior to working at AlertBoot, Mr. Lee served in the South Korean Navy. He holds both a B.S. and an M.S. from Tufts University in Medford, Massachusetts, U.S.A.